“When Medical Intervention Meets Elephants: An Anesthetic Dilemma During Poison Arrow Treatment”

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The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust has captured a remarkable video showing how veterinarians can save injured animals in the wild. The footage shows a five-ton bull elephant getting sedated after being hit by a poisoned arrow. The helicopter filmed the area where the herd of elephants was situated before landing near a team of Kenya Wildlife Service vets. The i.nj.ured male elephant had two w.o.unds from the arrow, and the vets noticed an infection. They used darts to inject the animal with the anesthetic, and once it lost consciousness, they worked quickly to clean up the w.o.unds and inject antibiotics. Overall, the video reveals 14 steps to treating wounded animals in the wild. Although the specific location of the footage is unclear, the charity hopes that the video will inspire people to become aware of the work done by animal welfare organizations in helping wildlife.

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From a safe distance, medical professionals used a dart to administer an anesthetic drug to the elephant. They also gave the animal a reversal drug to intensify the effect of the anesthetic. Observers from a helicopter witnessed the elephant getting back up after the procedure. The charity disclosed that they have given medical attention to 2,411 elephants over the last 15 years.

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The elephant falls to the ground and lies on its side, with its massive trunk resting on the floor.

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As per a recent post on Facebook, it has been highlighted that veterinarians give paramount importance to working together when it comes to treating hurt animals living in the wild. This is especially significant when dealing with a massive patient weighing around 5 tons, in agony, and possibly not willing to interact with humans.

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