Cheerful Mud Wrestling Baby Elephants Turn Blushing Red with Fun

A delightful sight took place when some parentless elephants indulged in a playful brawl in the mud, adorning themselves with red dust. It happened at Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park, where these elephants, being looked after by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust at Ithumba, derived pleasure from rolling around and flinging handfuls of red earth onto themselves. Apart from providing fun, the thick coating of mud and dust acts as a safeguard for their skin against the sun and bothersome insects.

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According to the Daily Mail, elephants love to cover themselves in dust and turn red. Two environmental consultants, Mick Baines and Maren Reichelt, were fortunate enough to witness this amusing sight. Baines likened the elephants to clowns putting on makeup. The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is home to a group of orphaned baby elephants who have been traumatized by humans. The trust’s primary goal is to rehabilitate them, and eventually, they are released back into the wild. These baby elephants enjoy visiting the deep mud bath enclosures where they can play and have fun.

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Rusty reported that there are some wild and adventurous elephants in Tsavo East National Park, Kenya who are willing to get their trunks dirty! This news was featured on the Daily Mail.

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The adorable baby elephant is covered in mud, blending perfectly with the earthy hues of its environment. This information was obtained from the Daily Mail.

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Mick Baines, an expert in environmental consulting, had a fun time with the baby elephants as they played around in the mud. The adorable orphans threw loads of red earth over themselves, making for a delightful sight. He commended the project’s efforts in reintegrating the elephants into their original habitat. However, Mick also pointed out that due to increased ivory demand from Asia, there has been an upsurge in poaching incidents, resulting in an increase in the number of elephants admitted to the program. Furthermore, loss of habitat due to expansion of agriculture contributes to conflicts between humans and elephants.

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Creating a stir: A group of orphaned elephants were residing at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Ithumba when they caused a commotion. This information was obtained from the Daily Mail.

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Tired out: The young pachyderm takes a break following a playful scuffle in the mud. Information sourced from the Daily Mail.

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Having a blast in the mud: The animals take a dip and roll around in a pool of mud, leaving them coated in the grey stuff. This account was reported by the Daily Mail. Baines and Reichelt were amazed to see previously rescued elephants, who had successfully adapted back into the wild, returning to visit their old enclosures. Nasalot, a 12-year-old female, even interacted with the pair. Other former orphaned elephants also brought along their wild pals to enjoy the mud baths and spend some time near the fences, giving an insight into the positive outcomes of the trust’s hard work.

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