“An elephant’s perilous journey to recovery – Healing from a poisoned arrow while battling anesthetic after-effects”

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In this video, a large elephant weighing five tons was sedated by veterinarians after being hit by a poisoned arrow. The footage was captured from helicopters and on the ground and shows the 14 steps taken to save injured animals in the wild. It is not clear where the footage was filmed, but it features the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a charity based in Kenya, and vets from the country’s wildlife service. At the start of the clip, a helicopter is seen circling a herd of elephants before landing near a team of vets from the Kenya Wildlife Service. As the male elephant with infected wounds from the poisoned arrow approached, vets shot darts from the helicopter to inject an anesthetic, causing the elephant to lose strength in its hind legs and eventually fall over. The vets worked quickly to prepare the animal for treatment, cleaning up the arrow wounds and injecting antibiotics using a mobile veterinary unit.

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The medical team cautiously approached the elephant and delivered a sedative via a dart from a distance. They also administered a reversal drug to amplify the sedative’s impact. The rescuers monitored the elephant’s recovery from their helicopter. The charity has rendered medical assistance to a total of 2,411 elephants over the last 15 years.

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The elephant falls down and lies on its side, with its massive trunk resting on the ground.

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As the majestic elephant dozes off, the medical team springs into action in a swift effort to remedy its poisoned injuries.

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As per a recent update on Facebook, veterinarians acknowledge how vital it is to work together to care for hurt wild animals. This is particularly crucial when it comes to treating a patient that can weigh as much as 5 tons, is experiencing discomfort and may not react well to human attention.

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